How companies engage in politics matters

Shareholders & the public are in the dark

Companies need to disclose

This year, the Corporate Reform Coalition is calling on these companies to disclose the money they spend engaging in politics to shareholders and the public.

Pfizer

Shareholder meeting: April 26, 2018 in Short Hills, N.J.
One of the largest manufacturers of prescription drugs, Pfizer’s belongs to an industry profiting off of the opioid crisis. Read the blog

Spending

Without disclosure its impossible to know all of Pfizer’s spending, but from what we do know it spends big to maintain its power and profits.  

ALEC & the Chamber

Pfizer is secretive about its involvement with the partisan ALEC and corporate- friendly Chamber of Commerce. 

Tweet @Pfizer

CLICK HERE to tell Pfizer that it’s time to be honest about the company’s engagement in politics.  

 Equifax

Shareholder meeting: May 3, 2018 in Atlanta, GA 
Equifax’s election spending likely got a foot in the door with Mick Mulvaney, who recently said his Congressional office was for sale. Read the blog

Data Breach

At the first shareholder meeting since the massive data breach, shareholders want to know how the company is engaging in attempts to clean up the mess on capitol hill.

Most hated

The company was recently named among the most hated companies that Americans have to deal with every day. 

Tweet @Equifax

CLICK HERE to tell Equifax that it’s time to be honest about the company’s engagement in politics.  

Facebook 

Shareholder meeting: May 31, 2018 in Menlo Park, CA

Scandals

The social media giant has faced intense scrutiny recently over the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Russian election meddling, and more.

Most Hated

The company was recently named among the most hated companies that Americans have to deal with every day. 

Tweet @Facebook

CLICK HERE to tell Facebook that it’s time to be honest about the company’s engagement in politics.  

Exxon

Shareholder meeting: May 30, 2018 in Dallas, TX. 

Denying Climate Science

The oil giant known for covering up climate change science faces request from shareholders to be transparent about the company’s political engagement. 

Trade Associations

Exxon doesn’t disclose payments to trade associations that have sought to mislead the public on climate science.

Tweet @Exxon

CLICK HERE to tell Exxon that it’s time to be honest about the company’s engagement in politics.  

Many companies successfully disclose

Below are a few of the reasons why disclosing political spending & lobbying activity is good for the corporate bottom line

SMART RISK MANAGEMENT

Shareholders deserve to know whether a company has sound policies in place to manage political activity and be able to assess the repetitional risk of that activity. 

AVOID A POLITICIAN'S SHAKEDOWN

In the face of a politician offering special access or corporate- friendly policies in exchange for secret support for the politician’s or party’s agenda an executive can cite the company’s policy of disclosing its political activity and sidestep any unsavory dealings. 

CUSTOMER BACKLASH

Increased transparency can protect against political donations that might trigger a backlash from customers as Americans are paying close attention to which companies have close ties to the President and seem to endorse or not endorse his agenda. 

Are your retirement savings protecting secret spending?

The major mutual fund companies like Vanguard have incredible power in corporate elections, power accumulated from the millions of retirement savings accounts they manage. With the volume of shares Vanguard controls the company can and should support shareholder resolutions calling for political spending & lobbying disclosure.